Showing posts with label comparisons in avid and adobe. Show all posts
Showing posts with label comparisons in avid and adobe. Show all posts

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Best Comparisons within FCP X, Avid MC and Adobe Premiere Pro CC

What? You don’t know the differences in FCP X, Avid MC and Adobe Premiere Pro CC yet? Fine, this paper can help you know more about them.

Nowadays, in editing word, there are so many editing software produced for us to decorate our videos, images and photos. A number of software options we often use in our life such as Autodesk Smoke, Grass Valley EDIUS, Lightworks, Media 100, Sony Vegas and Quantel. The lion’s share of editing is done on three platforms: Apple Final Cut Pro X, Avid Media Composer or Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Especially, the last three editors appear frequently no matter in our daily life or work.


Surely, they three have common points and differences, now we’ll make a comparison in three editors. To know more about them, let’s read the article below:

Specific Introductions about FCP X, Avid Media Composer and Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Apple Final Cut Pro X  

This update is the tipping point for many FCP 7 users. Enough updates have been released in over two years to address many of the concerns professional editors have expressed. 10.1 requires an operating system update to Mavericks (10.9 or later) and has three marquee items – a revised media structure, optimization for 4K and overall better performance. It is clear that Apple is not about to change the inherent design of FCP X. This means no tracks and no changes to the magnetic timeline. As with any update, there are plenty of small tweaks, including enhanced retiming, audio fades on individual channels, improved split edits and a new InertiaCam stabilization algorithm.

FCP X’s performance was optimized for Mavericks, the new Mac Pro and dual GPU processing. By design, this means improved 4K throughput, including native 4K support for ProRes, Sony XAVC and REDCODE camera raw media files. Along with Final Cut Pro X 10.1, Apple also released updates to Motion and Compressor. 

Brief steps for importing files in FCP X

Avid Media Composer 

The biggest feature of Media Composer 7.

0.3 is optimization for new operating systems. It is qualified for Windows 8.1 and Mac OS X 10.8.5, 10.9 and 10.9.1. There are a number of interface changes, including separate audio and video effects palette tabs and changing the appearance of background processing indicator icons. Transcode choices gain a set of H.264 proxy file codecs. 

These had been used in other Avid news and broadcast tools, but are now extended into Media Composer. Support for RED was updated to handle the RED Dragon format. Avid added background transcoding services and FrameFlex – Avid’s solution for bigger-than-HD files. Media Composer also accepts mixed frame rates within a single timeline, by applying Motion Adapters to any clip that doesn’t match the frame rate of the project.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC 

The current build of Premiere Pro CC was released towards the end of 2013. Adobe has been enhancing editing features with each new update, but two big selling points of this version are Adobe Anywhere integration and Direct Link between Premiere Pro CC and SpeedGrade CC.

Since you are working directly with the Premiere Pro timeline, SpeedGrade functions with a subset of its usual controls. Operations, like conforming media to an EDL, are inactive. Direct Link facilitates the use of various compressed codecs that SpeedGrade wouldn’t normally handle by itself, since this is being taken care of by Premiere Pro’s media engine. When you’ve completed color correction, the saved timeline is sent back to Premiere Pro. 
Clips in Premiere Pro with applied Lumetri effects also require more resources to play well and rendering definitely helps. The color roundtrip results were good in my tests, with the exception of any clips that used a filter layer with a LUT. These displayed with bizarre colors back in Premiere Pro.

Brief steps for importing files in Adobe

Differing business models in three

Apple, Avid and Adobe have three distinctly different approaches. Adobe and Avid offer cross-platform solutions, while Final Cut Pro X only works on Apple hardware. Users may install the software on as many computers as they like (Mac or PC), but only two can be activated at any time.

Apple’s software sells through the Mac App Store. Individual users may install and use these applications on any Mac computers they own, but enterprise users are supposed to purchase volume licenses to cover one installation per computer. FCP X uses a special version of XML for timeline interchange with other applications, so if you need to send material via EDL, OMF or AAF – or even interchange with previous versions of Final Cut Pro – you will need to augment FCP X with a variety of third-party utilities.

Avid Media Composer remains the only one of the three that follows a traditional software ownership model.  You purchase, download and install the software and activate the license. You may install it on numerous Macs and PCs, but only one at a time can be activated. Thanks to Avid’s installation and activation process, Media Composer is the most transportable of the three. Simply carry Mac and Windows installers on a USB key along with your activation codes.

Dealing with formats

All three applications are good at handling a variety of source media codecs, frame rates and sizes. In some cases, like RED camera files, plug-ins need to be installed and kept current. Both Apple and Avid will directly handle some camera formats without conversion, but each uses a preferred codec – ProRes for Final Cut Pro X and DNxHD for Media Composer. If you want the most fluid editing experience, then transcode to an optimized codec within the application.

Most of us work with HD (or even SD) deliverables, but higher resolutions (2K, UHD, 4K) are around the corner. All three NLEs handle bigger-than-HD formats as source media without much difficulty. I’ve tested the latest RED EPIC Dragon 6K camera files in all three applications and they handle the format well. Both Adobe and Apple can output bigger sequence sizes, too, such as 2K and 4K. For now, Avid Media Composer is still limited to HD (1920 x 1080 maximum) sequences and output sizes.

Related articles:

  1. XAVC to FCP on Mac - XAVC is still a new recording format that fails to be recognized by FCP, iMovie, Premiere and Avid.
  2. H.264 .MOV footage to Final Cut Pro X - H.264 codec is often used in editing from cameras to editing software.
  3. Put MTS into Premiere Pro on Mac - Mske Sony MTS files accepted by Premiere.